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See the Lawyers Without Rights Traveling Exhibit this May

By Valerie on April 22, 2019//Leave a comment

We are honored to be hosting the traveling exhibit “Lawyers Without Rights: Jewish Lawyers in Germany Under the Third Reich,” May 1 through May 31 at both the Downtown and Vista locations!

 

This eye-opening exhibit was conceived in 1998 when an attorney visiting Berlin asked the Berlin regional bar association if they had a list of Jewish attorneys whose licenses had been revoked by the Nazi regime. This question spurred the regional bar to not only compile a list of names, but to research and discover as much as they could about each one of the individuals on the list and their fate. The exhibit uses images of personal photographs and correspondences to tell the stories of 26 Jewish men and women practicing law during the rise of the Nazi regime.

 

After the Berlin regional bar transformed the information into an exhibit, other regional bar associations asked if they could show the exhibit and add information from their region. Eventually, the German Federal Bar and the American Bar Association adapted the exhibit so it could be displayed internationally. A book, “Lawyers Without Rights: The Fate of Jewish Lawyers in Berlin After 1933,” was also produced by the German Federal Bar and American Bar Association. It includes over 1,600 bios of Jewish lawyers practicing in Berlin who could no longer practice after 1938 because of their Jewish ancestry.

 

Also, we have partnered with Anti-Defamation League San Diego to host an opening reception for the exhibit on Thursday, May 2nd, from 6:00 pm to 8:00 pm. We will have a guest speaker discussing the rule of law and the importance of an independent judiciary as a safeguard to our constitutional freedoms. Beverages and food, including desserts from Extraordinary Desserts provided by LexisNexis, will be served at the reception. Registration is required for the opening reception, but no reservations are needed to view the exhibit. It is free and open to the public during the Law Library’s regular business hours.

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